Participants IPY-Kinnvika 2008 spring operations
 
1. Laura Arppe, University of Helsinki, Ice core team
2. Emilie Beaudon, University of Lapland (Finland), Ice core team
3. Poul Christoffersen, Scott Polar Research Institute, Ice dynamical team
4. Per Olof Edvinsson, Swedish Polar Research Secreteriat, Logistical team
5. Roman Finkelnburg, Technical University of Berlin, Climatology team
6. Venkata Gandikota, University of Lapland (Finland), Ice core team
7. Mike Gerasimoff, AVG Project Consulting, Canada, Ice core team
8. Piotr Głowacki, Polish Academy of Sciences, Snow pit and Ice core team
9. Alun Hubbard, University of Aberystwyth, Ice dynamical team
10. Janne Johansson, Swedish Polar Research Secreteriat, Logistical team
11. Sakari Kankaanpää, University of Lapland (Finland), Ice core team
12. Bartek Luks, Polish Academy of Sciences, Snow pit team
13. Olli-Pekka Mattila, University of Helsinki, Snow pit team
14. Adrian McCallum, Scott Polar Research Institute, Ice dynamical team
15. Marco Möller, University of Aachen, Climatology team
16. Rickard Pettersson, Uppsala university, Ice dynamical team
17. Veijo Pohjola, Uppsala university, Ice dynamical team
18. Gerit Rotschky, The Norwegian Polar Institute, Snow pit team
19. Dieter Scherer, Technical University of Berlin, Climatology team
20. Christoph Schneider, University of Aachen, Climatology team
21. Lasse Tano, Swedish Polar Research Secreteriat, Logistical team

Participants IPY-Kinnvika 2008 summer operations
 
1. Matthias Braun, University of Bonn, Climatology team
2. Piotr Dolnicki, University of Silesia, Geophysics and Geomorphology team
3. Roman Finkelnburg, Technical University of Berlin, Climatology team
4. Rafael Garcia, UNIS (Longyearbyen), Invertebrate Biology
5. Piotr Głowacki, Polish Academy of Sciences, Scientific leader onboard RV Horyzont II
6. Andy Hodson, University of Sheffield, Ice and Fiord Biology team
7. Malu Jiminez, UNIS (Longyearbyen), Invertebrate Biology
8. Anu Kaakinen, of Helsinki, Quaternary Geology and Stratigraphy team
9. Mika Kalakoski, University of Helsinki, Quat. Geology and Stratigraphy and Logistical team
10. Antoine Kies, University of Luxembourg, Geophysics and Geomorphology team
11. Marcin Klisz, Polish Academy of Sciences, Bedrock Geology Team
12. Krzysztof Krajewski, Polish Academy of Sciences, Bedrock Geology team
13. Wieslawa Krawczyk, University of Silesia, Geophysics and Geomorphology team
14. Frauke Kubischta, University of Helsinki, Quat. Geology and Stratigraphy team
15. Fred Maier, Technical University of Berlin, Climatology team
16. X Matula, Agricultural University of Wroclaw, Algae Biology team
17. John Moore, University of Lapland (Finland), Ice core team
18. Marco Möller, University of Aachen, Climatology team
19. Antti Ojala, University of Helsinki, Quat. Geology and Stratigraphy team
20. David Pearce, British Antarctic Survey, Ice and Fiord Biology team
21. Veli-Pekka Salonen, University of Helsinki, Quat. Geology and Stratigraphy team
22. Lasse Tano, Swedish Polar Research Secreteriat, Logistical team
23. X Wojtun, Agricultural University of Wroclaw, Algae Biology team

 

The Kinnvika station and its facilities

  The Kinnvika station.jpg

The Kinnvika station, built for the 3rd International Polar Year, also called the International Geophysical Year. The staion was built by a Swedish-Finnish-Swiss expedition and at that the station was simply called the SFS station. Photo: Veijo Pohjola.
 

  The houses most used_Pohjola.jpg

The houses most used by our expedition are 1. The old Cosmogenic Laboratory, as we used as dormitory AKA the Meatlocker due to the lower than average temperatures inside and the excess of dormant bodies in the pyramid shaped hut, 2. The Main House or the Mess house, which we used for eatings, tool shops, storage and gatherings, 3. The Garage and main workshop, 4. The Sauna, in which we almost got up to (+) 50 degrees C when firing the stove up. Photo: Veijo Pohjola.

 

 

Weather and logistical challenges during the two first legs

The largest obstacle for work and travel in winter conditions is not temperature. It is the wind that sets the limit for how successful a field work is. Even moderate wind creates snow drift that blurs the vision, and at higher speeds creates a visibility of a few meters. Snow gets in everywhere, and the best is to wait for calmer conditions to manage travel and work. A problem with Northern Svalbard is that snow drift is the norm, and thank’s to reliable navigation GPSs some transports can be performed fairly safe at least at moderate winds.
 

average air temperature and wind speed.gif

The figure above show the average air temperature (red) and average wind speed (blue) during the first leg on 340 m a.s.l. on Vestfonna during the period 9 – 30 April.
 
 
During the first leg we had only two short periods of calm weather, giving that activities on Vestfonna was mainly focused around to these periods. The first 10 days was very windy. Fortunately we had relatively good weather when flying in. The average wind on Vestfonna during legs 1 measured at the UU-line AWS 9 – 30 April was 6.7 m/s, a wind speed that generates drift, and with the normal gustiness of the winds this means drift that causes problems with field work and transportation. This was the average situation under the period. Just imagine how it was during the windy periods! The ice coring team had large problems since they got transported upto their camp when the stormy period started. Fortunately they got up their tents, and control of most of their equipment, before the gale roared on. Leg 2 was quieter than the stormy leg 1, but still the Rijpfjorden station recorded high wind speeds, with maximum winds close to storm strength in the period.

 

  air temperature.gif

These two figures show similar data as the Vestfonna AWS, but from the UNIS weather station at the beach in Rijpfjorden ca 100 km east of Kinnvika. This data is available for the full period of legs 1 to 3. 100  = 11 April, 120 = 1 May, 140 = 21 May.
 
 
Leg 3 enjoyed warmer weather, calmer conditions, and better snow conditions than leg 1 and 2 experienced. Still though, in such environments good weather stays normally 6 hours, and that is the period activities have to foresee and capitalize on. For roving teams it is probably best to stay at the station during high wind event, but make temporary camps at the ice cap to be efficient during periods of better weather. Teams that are stationary need strong tents, and probably they shall also utilize snow caves, that are more silent rooms during storms. ….